17-09-2017
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Dutch Design Awards www.dutchdesignawards.nl

Dutch Design Awards 2009

By 17-09-2017

15 Years Dutch Design Awards
Dutch Design Awards (DDA) celebrates the future. The open call for Dutch Design Awards 2017 announces the 15th edition of the most prestigious design prizes in the country. DDA has rewarded Dutch designers since 2003 for their most impressive, innovative, ground-breaking and sometimes world-improving projects. In this anniversary year DDA celebrates the future with a new batch of designs, publishing the archive and telling the story behind 15 years of the best of Dutch design. Today we show some of the winners from 2009.

Iris van Herpen – Mummification Fall Winter 09/10
The ‘Mummification’ couture of Iris van Herpen has little in common with the taut but hardly elegant mummies. Van Herpen made 10 pieces for this entirely leather couture collection, each of which was made by hand and is extremely labour intensive. The silhouette of the collection is also striking. Corsets consist of countless leather strips strung together, high-necked sleeveless dresses fall in clever pleats around the lower part of the body.

Ontwerplabel VIJ5 – FlexVaas
The FlexVaas consists of a basic porcelain form with three different, exchangeable top pieces, which lets you adapt the vase to suit the specific bouquet. You attach them to the basic vase with clamps like those on preserving jars. This gives the vase a contradictorily nostalgic quality, which we are not accustomed to seeing in this product. Vij5 strives for the cross-fertilization of design mentalities as the basis for its product designs.

Aime Creative Direction – Porcelain Tableware
Designer and culinary creator Aldo Bakker used actions such as pouring and sprinkling as the starting point for discovering equally pure forms, subordinating the meaning or recognizability of an object to his experimental quest. The wonderful thing is that when users pick up these table objects now, they quickly understand them intuitively. The greatest merit of this tableware is simply that it has found its highly individual and indeed beautiful form in an authentic manner.

Maarten Baas – Real Time
A man is hidden in this rather inconspicuous clock. Literally at regular intervals, the man draws clock hands on the inner side of the clockwork-less glass face to indicate the time. While some people experience time as rushing by and others as a slowly crawling phenomenon, Baas visualizes time. He reinforces this visual, philosophical idea by working it out further in other projects. Baas fiddles around on the edges of design by making anti-design.

 Thonik – 11e architectuur Biennale in Venetië
For the Biennale’s visual identity, Thonik chose the globe and the archetypical house as symbols. This choice may not seem very original, but the way in which the forms were used in the graphic applications and for the three-dimensional objects is certainly surprising. By combining the forms, a flowing continuity is created that refers to the ornamentation and beauty of the city of Venice.

Boy Bastiaens – Atelier LaDurance
On account of authenticity and because of the quality Japanese denim, Boy Bastiaens decided to package the jeans as sushi. Every pair of trousers is rolled up in a little bamboo mat fastened with Velcro. Packaging plays an important role in Atelier LaDurance ’s brand communication. The bamboo packaging evokes the same feeling of authenticity as the denim and also provides the same tactile experience.

Gijs Kast – Bohnhase
The book Böhnhase, which was Gijs Kast’s final project before graduating in 2008 from the Design Academy Eindhoven, seems like a practical joke that got out of hand. Kast came up with the idea for the booklet when he became engrossed in the ‘black economy’ in the Doornakkers neighbourhood in Eindhoven, where he lives.That gave him the idea of making a counterpart to the Yellow Pages business directory. Kast’s ‘Black Pages’ provide an excellent series of portraits of people living in the neighbourhood. Subsidy from the Fonds BKVB made it possible for him to publish Böhnhase on his own, in an edition of 1,200 copies.

Rene Put – Braille postzegels
TNT post commemorated in 2009 the development of the script for blind people by Louis Braille, This,was done with a sheet of special postage stamps, designed by René Put. Graphic designer Put has combined Latin script with Braille on the 12 postage stamps. On each stamp there are three words containing two letters executed in Braille. For the sighted user, it is a puzzle to work out what the word is. Put deliberately chose words which have meaning for both visually impaired people and people with normal sight.

Richard Vijgen & Thomas Kopperschlaeger – Onder anderen
Onder Anderen (Among Others) is a project of artist duo Germa Huijbers and Carolina Agelink with the aim to encourage cohesion in the ‘Professor’ neighbourhood in Delft with the sharing of chilhood memories. Vijgen and Kopperschlaeger designed the 30 placed notices and they developed the website for Onder Anderen.The objects can be viewed on the website either geographically or chronologically. The simple set-up of the website makes it eminently suitable for a broad target audience.

Postma Graphics & Motion – The Big Bank Theory
In order to communicate the conversion from a specific investment bank to an asset management bank in a plausible manner, advertising agency Dawn made the animation Big Bank Theory. This theory explains why big banks are doomed to grow at the expense of savers and investors. Needless to say, Alex is different. This advertisement succeeds in this and is one of the few that is capable of explaining the bank crisis in 60 seconds. It is visually attractive, original in its execution and humoristic as well.

Studio Roosegaarde – Flow 5.0
Hundreds of fans, mounted on screens, react to the sound and motion of passers-by. The effects can be seen and felt. With Flow 5.0 Daan Roosegaarde has once again managed to mobilize technical resources in such a way that people are challenged to engage with the space and the technology associated with the installation. One of its strengths is the fact that Flow 5.0 is ‘functionless’, but at the same time extremely logical and concrete.

Wieki Somers – Merry-Go-Round Coat rack
This coak rack has no counter, no fixed coat racks with hooks, but a jolly red-and-white merry-go-round with ropes to hoist up your coat. Each rope has a button that can be secured behind a small lock, so that nobody can make off with your coat. As well as a useful device, the coat carrousel is an inventive installation that elicits interaction with the audience.The designers have shown that in good design, functionality sits quite well with an artistic intervention in human behaviour.

 BNO Piet Zwart Prijs – Gert Dumbar
Jury member Paul Mijksenaar: “Reviewing the list of previous winners, it is clear that Gert Dumbar more than deserves to be included. Of all the previous winners, he actually shows the strongest affinity with Piet Zwart, especially as regards the playfulness in his work. His famous Mondriaan Poster – representing typical Mondriaan style elements such as coloured bars photographed in the space like an installation – would fit well in Piet Zwart’s famous stampbooklet, just like his well-known posters through which he introduced ‘staged photography’ to the Netherlands. Just like Piet Zwart, he also worked spatially, in particular on exhibitions such as the travelling ‘Dutch Design’ exhibitions, the spatial elements of which also formed the packaging. Dumbar also masters an ‘austere’ line, which finds its expression in corporate identities for the Dutch Railways, Aegon, Hollandse Beton Groep, Spaarnestad, and – a high point in his career – the Royal Dutch PTT (later KPN), for which he designed many visual identities over the years, including stamps, forms, and the interior design of the Post Offices. Later, he added to his list of achievements the highly acclaimed visual identity for the Dutch Police, which became particularly known by the striping on all police boats, aircrafts, and vehicles. Before establishing Studio Dumbar, he was already co-founder of Tel Design in The Hague – the counterpart of Total Design, the design bureau with the major customers among which many government organisations. With Tel Design, the Amsterdam-based Total Design had another self-willed competitor to contend with.”