09-04-2017
Complete overview

Dutch Design Daily

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Friso Dijkstra www.studio-friso.com

Where is that breeze coming from?

By 09-04-2017

ONE WEEK ABOUT Dutch Designers in Milan by Connecting the Dots in cooperation with Civica Scuola Interpreti e Traduttori ‘Altiero Spinelli’

It is easy to get lost exploring Galleria Rossana Orlandi. It very much resembles the secret gardens that you read about in some novels. Fascinating objects are being exposed and admired by hundreds of visitors on a warm Italian springtime afternoon. You may feel hot, yet you are unable to stop exploring such a charming place.

Imagine what you feel when a yellow ventilator suddenly appears at the top of the stairs. It’s not a common one. It’s designed by Friso Dijkstra, who looks very eager to lead you through this designful maze. With its brilliant color (so far, it’s available in gold and silver) and harmonious shape, the Yer ventilator was designed to be a contemporary addition to an old-style ambience. Its rich appearance, which derives from the aluminium it’s made of, reflects the light and lights up its surroundings. The airflow is adjustable thanks to a control knob and allows the user to be cooled by a gentle breeze.

The ventilator, he says, was originally made for and presented at the Istanbul Art Biennale. It was inspired by the boudoir style of ancient Constantinople, where social activity took place on low-to-the-ground pillow beds and tapestries. The fan was designed as an addition to the setting of a contemporary boudoir. Reminiscent of an opium flower it is constructed out of individual aluminium parts are welded together.

And what about Friso? You may be surprised in getting to know someone so creative and yet so practical. His ventilator is a great example of his rational approach, which is harmoniously coupled with a minimalist sense of cultural, poetic relevance.

Friso graduated at the Design Academy Eindhoven and set up his own industrial design studio in 2006 in Amsterdam. Each product, he says, should represent and advance from where it originally derived from and should adapt to the setting and the environment. Even here, in Galleria Rossana Orlandi, among a wide range of colors and shapes, the yellow ventilator is able to create harmony.

Text: Martina Pianezzola and Ilaria Arghenini – students of Civica Scuola Interpreti e Traduttori ‘Altiero Spinelli’